About

Student examining slide under microscopeToday, most MIT students graduate having had limited or no direct experience with or exposure to applied ethics or rigorous public interest work, either through their courses or other programs. In the curriculum, MIT currently lacks a universal ethics education requirement (or ethics GIR) for undergrads, and research actually suggests that engineering education itself creates a “culture of disengagement” and that student concerns for public well-being “decline significantly over the course of their engineering education.”

Co-created by the Office of the Experiential Learning (within the Office of the Vice Chancellor) and the Philosophy Section of the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy with input from across the MIT community, the Experiential Ethics program aims to create a new approach to ethics education that takes advantage of MIT’s unique strengths in experiential learning. Experiential Ethics will complement new curricular approaches to ethics and social responsibility (like those being planned in the new College of Computing) as well as existing ethics coursework and programming in the Philosophy Section of the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy and embedded in programs such as NEET and GEL.